» Campaigns » Radioactivity in the marine environment

See below the index for a brief synopsis of each item on this page



Is the Blackwater Estuary MCZ being assessed for the impact of discharges from the decommissioning of Bradwell nuclear power station ?

We provide here a chronological record (October 2015 to February 2016) of the enquiries made by Marinet to the Environment Agency concerning the issuing of a discharge licence to Magnox Limited for waste radioactivity, heavy metals and nitrates arising from the dissolution of fuel element debris during the decommissioning of Bradwell nuclear power station, Essex. […]

Marinet asks Environment Agency whether Bradwell’s nuclear discharges are legal

We provide here the text of a letter, 5th October 2015, from Marinet to the Chairman of the Environment Agency’s Board, which asks the Agency whether the nuclear waste discharges which it is permitting from the Bradwell nuclear power station, located on the Blackwater estuary in Essex, are legal. Download letter as a pdf file. […]

Radioactivity from Bradwell nuclear power station challenges the Blackwater MCZ

We provide here the text of the submission made by Marinet, 18th September 2015, to the Environment Agency concerning a permit application by Magnox Limited to be granted an extended licence to discharge waste radioactivity into the Blackwater estuary (Blackwater, Colne, Roach and Crouch Estuaries Marine Conservation Zone) which arises from the dissolution treatment process […]

Marine Implications of MAGNOX FED dissolution, June 2014

We provide here a copy of a paper, titled Marine Implications of MAGNOX FED dissolution, prepared for Marinet by marine pollution consultant, Tim Deere-Jones, dated June 2014. This paper reports on the nature of the new process designed to manage “fuel element debris” (FED) at the Magnox nuclear power stations at Dungeness (Kent), Bradwell (Essex) […]

Increased sea to land transfer of radioactivity due to winter storms

Report by Tim Deere-Jones, marine radioactivity consultant, on increased sea-to-land transfer of radioactivity as a result of winter storms, 2013-2014. Read report here.

Is Thorium as a fuel “a silver bullet for the nuclear industry”?

We provide here the text of an article by Oliver Tickell, Thorium: Not ‘green’, not ‘viable’, and not likely, which explains the both the advantages and disadvantages of using Thorium as the raw material for nuclear fuel. The article concludes that Thorium is not a viable alternative to conventional Uranium/Plutonium based fuels.

Radiation Basics

We provide here an article written by the Nuclear Information and Resource Service (NIRS), Washington DC, USA, which explains in simple terms what ionising radiation actually is, and its likely health effects. This article, along with many others, may also be viewed at the NIRS website

Shortcomings in the “Stress Test” for UK nuclear power stations following Fukushima

We provide here a summary written by marine radioactivity consultant, Tim Deere-Jones — of his 2011 Report for the Nuclear Free Local Authorities into the adequacy and otherwise of the “stress test” Report by the Office for Nuclear Regulation into UK nuclear power plants following the Fukushima disaster in Japan. The report by Tim Deere-Jones reveals a disturbing range of problems relating to the use of emergency cooling water in order to keep the nuclear reactors and spent fuel cooling ponds in a safe condition following the accident at Fukushima, and the failure of the UK Office for Nuclear Regulation Report to fully consider these issues.

Adequacy and otherwise of the “Stress Test” Report by the Office for Nuclear Regulation into UK nuclear power plants following the Fukushima disaster in Japan

Summary written by marine radioactivity consultant, Tim Deere-Jones, of his 2011 Report for the Nuclear Free Local Authorities into the adequacy and otherwise of the “stress test” Report by the Office for Nuclear Regulation into UK nuclear power plants following the Fukushima disaster in Japan. The report by Tim Deere-Jones reveals a disturbing range of problems relating to the use of emergency cooling water in order to keep the nuclear reactors and spent fuel cooling ponds in a safe condition following the accident at Fukushima, and the failure of the UK Office for Nuclear Regulation Report to fully consider these issues.

Release of Radiation via Cooling Water in New Designs of Nuclear Power Stations

This report, Liquid Radioactive Waste Discharges from the UK’s Proposed new Reactors  published in March 2011 by Tim Deere-Jones, a marine pollution consultant, records the nature and amount of radioactivity likely to be discharged via cooling water into the estuarine and coastal environment from the new designs of nuclear power station proposed for the UK. […]

why we should not risk irreversible damaging levels of radioactive contamination to our marine environment from the UK’s proposed New Nuclear Reactor Installation Programme

We provide here an article by Mike King, MARINET member (Gt Yarmouth), which explains why we should not risk irreversible damaging levels of radioactive contamination to our marine environment from the UK’s proposed New Nuclear Reactor Installation Programme.

Are we evaluating the risk from failure of our nuclear power stations?

This is a copy of an article from the San Luis Obispo Journal (SLO Journal), California, USA, where environmentalists are asking the question — what happens if Japan is repeated here? MARINET asks, are we similarly evaluating the true nature of the impact of a serious failure, for whatever reason, of our nuclear power stations in the UK?